Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘mold remediation’

Mold: The Whole Picture
Pt. 3, A Neglected Public Health Problem

by Ellen McCrady
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:Ellen Ruth McCrady, publisher of Abbey Publications and editor of the Abbey Newsletter, Alkaline Paper Advocate, and The Mold Reporter passed away on March 5, 2008.

There have been so many stories in the news media lately about mold-infested schools and residences that I decided to skip the installments on remediation, buildings, and preventive measures for the time being, and go right to the personal narratives of people whose lives or health had been affected. In the next issue I will try to suggest ways to recognize the danger and describe some of the options available to victims. -Ed.
 

The first story appeared in the January 2000 issue of the WAAC Newsletter, in the Health and Safety column:

My name is Kim Harper. Seven years ago, I was exposed to mold. I worked in a small historical museum where I managed the archival collection and, later, the operations of a twelve-building museum village.

I absolutely loved my job working with artifacts and researching family history. Much of the archival collection was housed in a 100-year-old school house. For several months I sorted through water-damaged ledgers and artifacts. Many were covered with a black soot-like dust. After a few months, I noticed I was losing my balance, my short-term memory was failing, and I began dropping things. Sometimes, it almost felt like I had been drinking. These symptoms led doctors to believe I had multiple sclerosis. My health was deteriorating rapidly.

My asthma, which was previously mild, began to bother me daily. I was taking up to 14 doses of Ventolin a day at work. My asthma became so bad that after ten months of working at the Museum, my doctor ordered a lung function test. This test showed my lung function had dropped almost 20%.

I went on to develop intense joint pain and fatigue. At first, I thought I was just coming down with the flu, but it never went away … never. This unusual flu-like illness caused confusion, extreme fatigue, and joint pain. I recall asking my board members to write down any requests because I would forget what they wanted by the time they left the building.

Slowly, I was forced to cut back extra volunteer work at the Museum. I left my Trustee position with the School Board and eventually had to leave my part-time job, and finally my work at the Museum. I went on sick leave for two months. My asthma and cognitive symptoms improved almost 90%. But this all changed when I returned to work.

After two weeks back to work in the archives, my breathing, fatigue and joint pain began to worsen. I was asked to clean a damp, 100-year-old furnace room that had chronic water problems and mold. Within two months, my lung function had dropped another 20%. I was taking several pain medications to get through the work day and up to 20 puffs of Ventolin. After two severe asthma attacks where I could not breathe, I was forced to leave work permanently. I realize now, I should never have returned to work after my sick leave. Since starting work at the Museum three years earlier, my lung function had dropped a total of 36%. My lungs were working at only 44% capacity.

After leaving work, my asthma did not get better as it did with the first sick leave. Over the next year away from work, I spent many days in hospital to help my breathing. In order to stay out of the hospital, I was forced to take large doses of medication to manage even the simplest of tasks. Doctors prescribed 38 puffs of medication a day along with Prednisone.

I have never been well enough to return to work. You see, we realized too late that work was causing my health problems. I now know that I should never have cleaned the old furnace room without proper protection.

My health has improved slightly since leaving the Museum. But without medication, my lungs are still bad. Since 1992 I have never been pain free. I have trouble managing daily activities and was forced to move from my two-story home to a home with fewer stairs.

Mold is everywhere, but if you have to work with it, take a few extra minutes to learn about it and make educated choices to protect yourself. If workers are having problems, they should stop working in the contaminated environment immediately. I would encourage them to go to an occupational health specialist experienced in the effects of mold. By knowing exactly what is making them sick, they can take the necessary protective steps. You should know that some workers will never be able to work in a contaminated environment once they have been sensitized. I only hope that everyone will understand a little protection and knowledge goes a long way.

We know many of us would never want to stop working in our exciting field. There is no need to panic, we just need to take a practical approach and take the time to get informed and protect ourselves. This way we can continue to work with the artifacts that we love so very much. Someone has to preserve our history.

If anyone would like to learn more, or would like to share their experience, they can contact the Harper Archives at mkharper@netcom.ca.

Regards, Kim Harper
Whitby, Ontario, Canada

[On March 16, Ms. Harper sent an e-mail message saying, in part, “I am happy to learn you are getting the word out to others…. We have spent years learning how to remove and protect our artifacts from the ravages of mold. I’m glad it’s time for us to spend some time on protecting staff. Every week I see an increased concern in dealing with the toxic effects of mold.”

[She recommended that interested people contact her at mkharper@netcom.ca, where she can provide feedback, suggest websites and literature, and discuss how to approach your employer or Health and Safety Committee. She also suggested looking into the following sites:

  • http://www.envirocenter.com/ENYOHPto review research by well-known expert in this field: Dr. Eckardt Johanning of the Eastern New York Occupational and Environmental Health Center in Albany, New York. He has helped museum workers exposed to Stachybotrys in Soho, New York. This site includes several resources to help identify and remediate molds. Early in March he discussed the health hazards of mold on the television program “48 Hours.”
  • http://www.radio.cbc.ca/programs/quirks/archives/98-99to listen to a 20-minute broadcast on “Librarian’s Lung.” The show interviews a few archivists and museum workers who share their experiences with mold and how it affected their health. You can also contact the radio station staff by e-mail at <<>quirks@toronto.cbs.ca>. Maybe they will do a follow-up.

[In the absence of clear guidelines from the government, she recommended that workers should understand how important it is to identify the suspect mold as soon as possible. “It can be as simple as taking a scotch tape sample,” she said, “and mailing it to a mycologist familiar with Stachybotrys and Aspergillus for identification. This way staff will know if they are dealing with a mycotoxin that needs more careful consideration. A photograph of the area also helps.”]

See also the Aspergillus Web Site

“This site is designed to provide information on pathogenic Aspergilli for clinicians and scientific researchers. The site includes DNA sequence data, a comprehensive bibliographic database, laboratory protocols, treatment information and discussion groups. The Aspergillus Web Site is sponsored by Alza Corporation and Ortho Biotech Inc. and the sponsors have access to the Web Site address book–as do all other Aspergillus Web Site users. The European Science Foundation has also made a contribution to the maintenance of the site.”


Robert J. Milevski, Preservation Librarian at Princeton University Libraries, related a personal experience with mold in 1994 on the Conservation DistList.

MORE ARTICLES BY THIS AUTHOR:

Mold
Part 1, Mold: The Whole Picture
Part 2, Assessment of Mold Problems
Part 3, A Neglected Public Health Problem
Part 4: Effect of Mold on Schools, Homes, & Human Beings

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Ellen Ruth McCrady, publisher of Abbey Publications and editor of the Abbey Newsletter, Alkaline Paper Advocate, and The Mold Reporter passed away on March 5, 2008.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Mold found growing on a water damaged support beam beneath the museum's floor

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MAR. 7, 2010

CONTACT: THE DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS MUSEUM

PHONE: (830) 444-0523

MUSEUM MOVES OUT OF MOLDY BUILDING

Since the discovery of mold inside the Douglas Fairbanks Museum’s new building over a month ago, museum staffers have been busy packing and moving the collections to safe climate-controlled storage offsite. The move was completed in mid-February.

“I’m happy to report that the collections do not appear to have suffered any damage as a result of the mold infestation,” museum curator Keri Leigh announced at the March board meeting in Austin. “Luckily the problem was discovered early on — about 10 days after we moved in — so we hadn’t uncrated any significant artifacts or hung anything on the gallery walls yet. We were so fortunate in that sense.”

The unfortunate news is that the museum’s planned re-opening, originally scheduled for March 1, has been postponed indefinitely pending repairs to the sick building. Extensive mold remediation, moisture intrusion repairs and replacement of key structural members will be required before the building can be safely opened to the public.

It’s obviously a major health issue,” Leigh said. “In addition to the dangers mold poses to the museum’s collection itself, my biggest concern is the health risks to staff and visitors.

“Most of the museum’s visitors have always traditionally been kids and the elderly, and those are the age groups most suceptible to harm from mold,” she explained. “Until the mold is remediated and the underlying moisture problems are fixed, there’s just no way we can continue to occupy this building or even consider opening it as a museum.”

Evidence of severe water damage, rust, dry rot and mold found under museum sub floor

Numerous case studies have shown mold to pose serious health risks to normal, healthy persons. The effects are even more severe and dangerous to the elderly, small children and infants, persons with compromised immune systems, asthma, breathing problems or mold allergies.

To make matters worse, Leigh herself is highly allergic to mold. Shortly after moving into the home in January, Leigh soon found herself suffering spells of dizziness, difficulty breathing, loss of short term memory and motor coordination, unexplained fatigue, joint pain, swelling of her face and extremities, skin rashes, and flu-like symptoms that just wouldn’t go away.

“For a couple of weeks there, I thought I just had the flu.” Leigh says. “But my symptoms weren’t getting any better and I couldn’t figure out why I was having all these other symptoms but no fever. It didn’t make sense.”

Then the mold was discovered about a week later. “While that was the worst news possible for the museum, it was kind of a relief to at least know what was making me so sick. As someone who has dealt with severe mold allergies from birth, finding out the home was ridden with mold explained all those symptoms. So at least I knew what the cause was, but of course it didn’t help me feel any better.”

“The only thing to do was for me to get myself and the museum collections out of the house as fast as possible.”

Leigh and museum staff quickly packed up the museum’s artifacts and put them in safe storage offsite. The next step was to get Leigh moved to temporary shelter for her own health.

“Once I got out of the house and into a mold-free environment, I started feeling better immediately,” she said.

But Leigh still has to travel to the museum frequently to deal with business matters once or twice a week. “It’s amazing – almost as soon as I step in the door, I’ll start sneezing. My eyes get all puffy and watery and it’s hard to breathe,” she says. “Within an hour or two I’m itching and scratching and have red bumps coming up on my skin. My brain will start to feel foggy and I can’t concentrate. The effect is instantaneous. So I’m trying to spend as little time here as possible.”

Severely water, dry rot and termite damaged wooden sheathing in attic

Although she is terribly disappointed, Leigh has come to accept the fact that the museum will not be opening in the building anytime soon. The repairs needed to remediate the mold, fix the moisture intrusion problems, and stabalize the structure are too extensive to be performed while the building is occupied.

“It’s really sad,” Leigh says. “I had such high hopes for this place just a few short months ago. It’s a lovely old Victorian home and I saw a lot of potential for the museum here. To find that this grand old house has sick building syndrome just breaks my heart because I love historic homes and hate to see something like this happen to them. It’s entirely preventable with proper care, conservation and maintenance. If homes are not cared for, these types of problems – termites, mold, wood-destroying organisms – set in and eventually just overtake the whole house.”

“It’s sort of like a cancerous growth in your home,” Leigh explains. “Early detection is key. If you can find the cancer early and remove it, it’s much less likely to come back. If it is not caught until the late stages, the cancer will spread like wildfire and be much more difficult and costly to get rid of. It may recur again and again, or it may prove fatal.”

For now, Leigh is just relieved that her health is improving and the museum’s collections are safe. “Luckily we discovered the mold and moisture problems quickly before the collections were uncrated or on the walls,” she says.

“While this is certainly a nightmare, it would have been so much worse had we actually been open to the public at the time. I have often shuddered to think of one artifact getting damaged or even one visitor or staffer getting sick from the mold. One is one too many,” says Leigh. “So I guess we were fortunate, if we try to look on the bright side of this.”

While Leigh looks for the bright side, the museum’s future hangs under a dark cloud. With grants and donating funding for nonprofit arts and cultural groups at an all-time low nationwide, many small museums like the Douglas Fairbanks are having to close their doors, either temporarily or permanently.

“The last two years have been particularly tough for us,” she says. “With the downturn in the economy, many of the funding sources we could always count on for support were either cutting grants altogether or giving much less. And the trend across the country is for even more cuts to arts, culture and educational organizations.

“When I see the Governors of big states like California and New York closing major parks and recreation facilities, and shuttering museums and libraries due to massive budget cuts, I really have to wonder how a small private museum like ours is going to stay afloat in this economy.” 

“Right now, our greatest obstacle is to have a permanent location that we can call our own,” Leigh explains. “We thought we had one here, and then we discover the building needs repairs to extensive for us to stay in it. So we’re basically right back to square one — using temporary office and exhibit space until we can settle into a new home.”

Leigh says just having a bricks-and-mortar location would most likely save the museum. Even in these tough and uncertain economic times, Leigh feels that the museum can stand on its’ own two feet without taxpayer funds.

“We’re always been self-supporting,” Leigh says. “The museum has been open since 1998 and has never accepted any public funds. All of our funding comes from donations and grants from private individuals and businesses, admission fees, gift shop sales, fundraisers and special events. We’re very proud of the fact that we’re not a burden to the taxpayer.

“We believe that if the silent film and local community think we provide a valuable service to the public, they will support us, and they always have before,” she says. “These are just tough times for everyone. We’re trying to weather the economic storm, like everybody else.”

The museum also raises additional funding from licensing and duplication fees charged to film producers and book publishers seeking to reproduce items from its’ collections, as well as fees charged to other museums when artifacts are loaned out for long-distance and traveling exhibits. The museum also has an online gift shop where Fairbanks fans can purchase books, DVD’s, apparel and memorabilia, with a percentage of sales going to the museum. “Every little bit helps right now,” Leigh says. “Especially when we don’t have a building that is open to the public where we can raise funds through admission fees, events, and the gift shop.”

“Our first priority now has to be finding either temporary or permanent space for the museum to operate,” she says.

Will the museum eventually return to the old house on St. George Street? Leigh says it’s possible.

“Sure, once the home is repaired and stabalized structurally, we could move right back in.” She says. “But there is a lot of serious work to be done here before the house will be fully repaired, and who knows how long that’s going to take? By that time, we may well be in a new permanent location with a long term lease commitment. And that’s what I hope will happen, the sooner the better. Finding us a new building is my only focus now. We desperately need to get our doors open to the public again.”

Anyone who has a suitable historic home or building they would consider donating or leasing to the Douglas Fairbanks Museum is encouraged to email or call (830) 444-0523 to discuss a resident curatorship, possible tax incentives or other options for your property. The museum is willing to relocate anywhere within the United States.

Read Full Post »

Planned museum faces new problems

 

The Gonzales Inquirer

February 16, 2010

For Keri Leigh and Greg Jackson, moving to Gonzales seemed to be the answer to their life-long dream of permanently locating a very unique museum.

The two indeed moved to Gonzales just a few short weeks ago to open the Douglas Fairbanks Museum, a place dedicated to the memory of the silent film star.

Plans were in place to open the museum in early March, just in time for Texas Independence Day.

But that has all changed, and they could possibly even be forced to move out of the city.

“We were so incredibly excited to be here. We just couldn’t wait to contribute to the Gonzales community and economy. We don’t know what we are going to do,” said Leigh.

The one thing they do know is the museum is not going to open as planned. In fact, they aren’t sure when it might open because they say they have encountered a problem with mold in the house on St. George Street in Gonzales.

“It’s our worst nightmare. Mold is not only extremely harmful to the structural integrity of the house itself, but also to the health of the home’s residents and museum visitors. We are already feeling the negative health effects ourselves, and the last thing we want is other people getting sick when they come to visit the museum. All of our artifacts and collections are now in imminent danger, as well as our personal property, and that’s a risk we simply can’t afford to take,” said Leigh.

“We had an allocated budget of $5,000 to re-locate the museum to Gonzales, and exhausted that just getting here,” said Leigh. “We didn’t worry since we planned to have our doors open by March 1st and would start bringing revenue in right away. Now, because of mold being discovered inside the home, we haven’t been able to un-crate a single artifact or hang any of our rare posters on the walls. Everything is on hold until this mold problem can be resolved. We can’t even open our doors to the public or begin to generate any revenue, which the museum desperately needs.”

The couple said they would consider another location in Gonzales because they like the city and want to have the museum located here.

“We have met some great people,” said Leigh. “We’d like to help this town thrive because everybody benefits. We want to help bolster the local economy with more historic tourism. Most of our visitors come from outside the state of Texas and all over the world. These are serious film fans and history buffs. They would love Gonzales and all it has to offer. We came here to open a wonderful museum for the people of Gonzales, and that is exactly what we are determined to do. One way or another. There just has to be a solution.”

One of the challenges they are facing is that wherever the museum is located, it also has to accommodate their living quarters.

The house they are now in is just under 1,500 square feet, which she said is the “minimum” needed to house the museum.

Time, too, is another factor. They are hoping to find some resolution to this problem in the next few weeks because they really want to get the museum up and running, a big reason being to generate much-needed income.

“We need something resolved in the next couple of weeks,” said Jackson. “The museum is losing money in admission fees, donations, and gift shop sales every day it remains closed.”

“We’re not in a financial position to delay the museum’s opening, or even to turn right around and move again,” Leigh stressed. “We are actually now over-budget. We didn’t see it coming, but the situation is what it is, and we somehow have to deal with it.”

“We’re not independently wealthy people who have a private museum as our personal little lark,” Leigh said. “This certainly isn’t the Guggenheim Museum, or the Smithsonian. It’s a very small, humble museum run out of our own home. We both work for a living to make ends meet, just like everybody else. The museum has always been something we do as a hobby part-time, a passion of ours that we love to share with others. We do it for educational and cultural enrichment, not financial. This is our service to the community. It’s how we give something back.”

The two moved here Jan. 1 from Austin, where the museum had been located inside their private residence for several years before finally moving to a larger space.

After a flood came through in 2007, wiping out the entire downstairs of the structure where the museum was located, the search began for a new place.

At that time, they began looking for another location but found the cost in Austin too much for their small budget. They even looked in California and Denver, Colo., the hometown of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.

But in the end, they decided to come to the Gonzales because someone they knew suggested it could be a good location with reasonable rent and a nice, historic atmosphere.

After paying a visit, they decided to take the leap and secured the house in Gonzales. They packed a moving truck and headed to Gonzales with high hopes of having a new place to live and re-opening their museum which had not had a permanent home for close to four years.

Everything seemed to be on track, said Leigh, and then they discovered a problem with the house, leading to their current situation.

But both stressed they’d like to remain in Gonzales if at all possible. Leigh and Jackson said though their museum is about the film industry, it’s also about history and they think that could be a good fit with Gonzales.

“It brings a bit of Tinseltown glamour to the city. It boosts the local arts and culture scene, something that I feel will be a hit both with locals and tourists. There are so many talented people here, and a surprisingly vibrant artists community for such a small town. I could easily envision Gonzales eventually becoming another Fredericksburg, or Luckenbach, or Santa Fe (New Mexico), famous not just for its history, but for its music, theatre, art and cultural attractions. Which in turn generates a great deal of prestige and revenue for the city,” said Leigh.

Leigh also points out that Gonzales is one of a handful of towns which has two theatres, something which excites them because showing silent films has become very popular across America.

“We would love to do regular screenings of silent films, as well as help sponsor childrens theatre workshops for kids who are interested in acting and the arts at both the Lynn and Crystal Theatres.” She explains. “Our goal is to partner with the local arts groups; to give presentations at the local schools, working with them to schedule field trips and group tours to the museum. Douglas Fairbanks’ biggest fans during his lifetime were children — he was every little boy’s hero, and we know the kids will love his movies. His appeal is timeless, even if his films are more than 80 years old. A love of the arts starts at an early age, and if you learn an appreciation for classic films as a youngster, you’ll love them all your life.”

In fact, it was silent films which Leigh watched as a child which led to the decision to start the Douglas Fairbanks Museum. In her research, Leigh said she discovered almost all of the great stars of the silent film era had museums, with the glaring exception of Fairbanks. He was a pioneer in the movie industry and literally helped shape that industry in the multi-billion dollar mammoth is has become today.

“Besides writing, producing, and starring in more than 35 now-classic films, Fairbanks also founded the nation’s first film school at the University of Southern California, helped to build Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, founded the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and served as its first president, hosted the first Academy Awards in 1929, among so many other accomplishments. His vast contributions to the film industry are too important to be forgotten,” Leigh stresses.

That, said Leigh, was a driving force in founding the museum. That all happened in 1998 in Austin when a group of “like-minded” people pooled their resources and started the museum.

They have collected many artifacts from the Fairbanks movie era and that’s what they display at their museum. They have roughly 1,200 artifacts which are displayed, including movie posters, photographs, programs, props and other memorabilia.

“All I know is that we have to do something soon,” Jackson adds. “Time is of the essence in the battle against mold. Given all these factors and variables, our smartest option may be to move to another building. How we’re going to do that, or where we’re going to go, I have no idea. I just hope the community of Gonzales will come to our aid and lend a helping hand.”

But for now, what will happen next remains a mystery. They are hoping there may be a house or downtown property for rent which they could utilize as a home and place for the museum.

“Perhaps there is a property owner out there reading this who would be willing to donate use of their property as a substantial tax write-off and that there are some incentives available to them from the city, county or state for doing so,” says Leigh. “Hopefully, someone would be at least willing to negotiate a rental at a substantial discount that we can afford. There are always options when people come together with a common goal and work toward a solution. I’ve seen it happen before and it’s amazing what people can do when they put their hearts and minds into something.

“We made a conscious decision to relocate the museum to Gonzales because we love the amazing history of this town and we see the potential of what it can become in the future,” she says. “We’re willing to work very hard to help make that happen. We’ve invested in Gonzales — now we’re hoping Gonzales will invest in us.”

Anyone who might have a solution or who would simply like to talk to Jackson and Leigh about the situation can contact them at 830-444-0523.

Copyright © 2010 The Gonzales Inquirer. All rights reserved.

Read Full Post »

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
  
FEB. 15, 2010
  
  
CONTACT:
  
THE DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS MUSEUM
 

KERI LEIGH, CURATOR

PHONE: 830-444-0523
 
 
 
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS MUSEUM RE-OPENING POSTPONED
 
 
 
The Douglas Fairbanks Museum’s re-opening, originally scheduled for Monday, March 1, 2010 is being postponed due to the discovery of toxic mold in the walls of its’ new building.
 
The historic 1890s home on Saint George Street was recently renovated and restored prior to the museum’s planned re-opening. Then mold was discovered in the main entrance hall area and inside the curator’s private office.
 
Inside they had already dedicated more than 800 square feet to gallery and exhibit spaces designed to showcase the history of American cinema and honor the memory of a pioneering silent film star.
Plans were in place to open the museum in early March, just in time for Gonzales’ Texas Independence Day celebrations. But that has all suddenly and unexpectedly changed.
 
“We were so incredibly excited to be here. We just couldn’t wait to contribute to the Gonzales community and economy.” said Leigh. “Now, we don’t know what we are going to do.”
 
The one thing they do know is the museum’s March 1st opening has been postponed. In fact, they aren’t sure when it might re-open. Depending on how long the mold remediation process takes, and how rapidly the Saint George Street flood control project can be completed, they may also consider having to relocate within Gonzales or move the museum to another city.
 
“It’s our worst nightmare. Mold is not only extremely harmful to the structural integrity of the house itself, but also to the health of the home’s residents and museum visitors. We are already feeling the negative health effects ourselves, and the last thing we want is other people getting sick when they come to visit the museum. All of our artifacts and collections are now in imminent danger, as well as our personal property, and that’s a risk we simply can’t afford to take.” said Leigh.
 
“We had an allocated budget of $5,000 to re-locate the museum to Gonzales, and exhausted that just getting here.” said museum curator Keri Leigh. “We didn’t worry since we planned to have our doors open by March 1st and would start bringing revenue in right away. Now, because of mold being discovered inside the home, we haven’t been able to uncrate a single artifact or hang any of our rare posters on the walls. Everything is on hold until this mold problem can be resolved. We can’t even open our doors to the public or begin to generate any revenue, which the museum desperately needs.”
“Since we are renting the home, getting the mold repaired is the owner’s responsibility.” Leigh explains. “Mold remediation can be a costly and time-consuming process, and even if the owner takes care of it quickly, there is a strong possibility that the mold could return in a few weeks or a few months. Until the source of moisture that causes mold to grow is completely eliminated, mold will always come back. That’s the unfortunate nature of the beast.”
 
“Being from out of town, we were unfamiliar with the flooding history of St. George Street when we moved here.” Leigh explains. “No one told us. It wasn’t until after we arrived that we learned of the St. George Street Drainage Project and the flood control measures the city is taking. We’re so happy that the city of Gonzales is making strides towards bringing commerce back to this street and has great plans for it in the future. We’d like to be a part of that growth, but how long the repair process will take could decide the fate of our museum. With mold growing in the house at an alarming rate, we can’t wait several more months for work on the street project to be completed. There’s just no way.”
 
“Of course we totally understand that these delays are beyond the city’s control.” She says. “I share their frustration. This has been one of the rainiest seasons on record, and work on the street drainage project has had to be extended due to soil instability on St. George Street. All the recent rains have only made the situation worse for everybody: the city work crews, the business owners, and the residents here. Just recently we had nine straight days of rain, and I saw for myself just how serious the flooding problem is. We had rainwater ponding all around our property, and the street itself looked like a small lake. My greatest concern is that water may be collecting under the house’s foundation, and that’s the most likely source of this mold growth inside the structure.”
 
“So now we are faced with two choices: either repair the mold in the home and wait for the city to complete the St. George Street Drainage Project, or move to another location immediately, either in Gonzales or Austin or elsewhere.”
 
Leigh said the museum board would consider another location in Gonzales because they like the city and want to have the museum located here.
 
“We have met some great people,” said Leigh. “We’d like to help this town thrive because everybody benefits. We want to help bolster the local economy with more historic tourism. Most of our visitors come from outside the state of Texas and all over the world. These are serious film fans and history buffs. They would love Gonzales and all it has to offer. We came here to open a wonderful museum for the people of Gonzales, and that is exactly what we are determined to do. One way or another. There just has to be a solution.”
 

Entrance hall where the mold was found

One of the challenges they are facing is that wherever the museum is located, it also needs to accommodate living quarters since there are two live-in caretakers of the residence and collections. The historic home they are now in is just under 1,500 square feet, which she said is the minimum needed to house the museum and private living spaces.
 
Time, too, is another factor. They are hoping to find some resolution to this problem in the next few weeks because the museum’s priceless artifacts, as well as their own personal property is at risk.
 
Both Leigh and the home’s caretaker Greg Jackson have been suffering mold-related health problems over the past few humid and rain-soaked weeks, and they know they can’t stay in a home riddled with toxic mold. They want to get the museum up and running as soon as possible, a big reason being to generate much-needed income.
 
“We need something resolved in the next couple of weeks,” said Jackson.  “The museum is losing money in admission fees, donations, and gift shop sales every day it remains closed.”
 
“We’re not in a financial position to delay the museum’s opening, or even to turn right around and move again,” Leigh stressed. “We are actually now over-budget with all the unexpected flood control project delays and now this toxic mold crisis. We didn’t see it coming, but the situation is what it is, and we somehow have to deal with it.”
 
” Things were finally looking up again,” said Jackson. “We’d found what seemed like the perfect new location to invest in, and now this. It’s a disaster.”
 
“We’re not independently wealthy people who have a private museum as our personal little lark,” Leigh laughed. “This certainly isn’t the Guggenheim Museum, or the Smithsonian.  It’s a very small, humble museum run out of our own home. We both work for a living to make ends meet, just like everybody else. The museum has always been something we do as a hobby part-time, a passion of ours that we love to share with others. We do it for educational and cultural enrichment, not financial. This is our service to the community. It’s how we give something back.”
The two moved here January 1st from Austin, where the museum had been located inside their private residence for several years before finally moving into a larger building. After a flood wiped out the entire downstairs of the structure where the museum was located, the search began for a new place in 2007. The nationwide search took more than 2.5 years.
 
The very high property values in Austin proved too much for their small budget. They even looked in California and Denver, Colo., the birthplace of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. (Jackson is also a Denver native) but found the property costs even higher there than in Texas. In the end, they decided to come to the Gonzales are because a longtime friend of the museum suggested it could be a good location with reasonable rent and a nice, historic atmosphere.
 
After paying a visit in December, they decided to take the leap and secured the house in Gonzales. They packed a moving truck and headed to Gonzales with high hopes of having a new place to live and re-opening their museum which had not had a permanent home for close to three years.
 
Everything seemed to be on track, said Leigh, and then they discovered the mold problem inside the house, leading to their current situation. “The home was completely renovated before we moved in, and for the first week or so all we could smell was fresh paint. It wasn’t until the rains came in mid-January that we began to notice that unmistakeable, dreaded smell of mold. We experienced it after the flood and know mold when we smell it. We just looked at each other and smacked our foreheads saying, `oh no, not again! Is this a bad dream?'”

Leigh (L) and Jackson (R) give a tour at the museum's former Austin location

But both stressed they’d like to remain in Gonzales if at all possible. Leigh and Jackson said though their private museum is about the film industry, it’s also about vital American history and they think that could be a good fit with Gonzales.
 
“It brings a bit of Tinseltown glamour to the city. It boosts the local arts and culture scene, something that I feel will be a hit both with locals and tourists. There are so many talented people here, and a surprisingly vibrant artists community for such a small town. I could easily envision Gonzales eventually becoming another Fredericksburg, or Luckenbach, or Gruene, small towns famous not just for their history, but for music, theatre, art and cultural attractions. Which in turn generates a great deal of prestiege and revenue for the city.”
 
Leigh also points out that Gonzales is one of a handful of small cities which has two theatres, something which excites her because showing silent films has become very popular across America.
 
“We would love to do regular screenings of silent films, as well as help sponsor children’ theatre workshops for kids who are interested in acting and the arts at both the Lynn and Crystal Theatres.” She explains. “Our goal is to partner with the local arts groups; to give presentations at the local schools, working with them to schedule field trips and group tours to the museum. Douglas Fairbanks’ biggest fans during his lifetime were children – he was every little boy’s hero, and we know the kids will love his movies. His appeal is timeless, even if his films are more than 80 years old. A love of the arts starts at an early age, and if you learn an appreciation for classic films as a youngster, you’ll love them all your life.”
 
In fact, it was the silent films Leigh watched as a child which led to her own appreciation of the art form and her eventual decision to start the Douglas Fairbanks Museum. In her research, Leigh said she discovered almost all of the great stars of the silent film era had museums, with the glaring exception of Fairbanks. He was a pioneer in the movie industry and literally helped shape that industry in the multi-billion dollar mammoth is has become today.
 
“Besides writing, producing, and starring in more than 35 now-classic films, Fairbanks also founded the nation’s first film school at the University of Southern California, helped to build Grauman’s Chinese Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, founded the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and served as it’s first president, hosted the first Academy Awards in 1929, among so many other accomplishments. His vast contributions to the film industry are too important to be forgotten,” Leigh stresses.
 
That, said Leigh, was a driving force in founding the museum. They have since collected many artifacts from the silent movie era documenting Fairbanks’ remarkable life and career, all exhibited at the museum. They have roughly 1,200 artifacts which are displayed, including rare movie posters, original still photographs, programs, props and other memorabilia.

Fairbanks Museum Curator Keri Leigh

 
Leigh, who is classically trained as a musician, journalist and historian, also worked at Austin’s O. Henry House Museum for six years. It was there she honed her knowledge of the preservation and display of rare artifacts, interpretation and narrative of history, as well as caring for and preserving historic structures, a skill that certainly comes in handy as she is forced to evaluate the effects of mold on a century-old home.
 
“It’s such a great old house,” she muses, looking wistfully around the mold-damaged home on St. George Street. “These old Victorians were built to last by craftsmen who not only made them functional, but works of art. I love this place and would like to see it saved. Of course there is still be hope for the home if repairs are made quickly and the street drainage project completed, but we may not be able to stay in the home long enough to see that come to pass. Unfortunately, our first concern has to be the museum’s collections, our health, and the health of the visitors. So if we have to move out, it will be terribly sad, but that’s what we may have to do.”
 
“All I know is that we have to do something soon,” Jackson adds urgently. “Time is of the essence in the battle against mold. Given all these factors and variables, our fastest option may be to move to another building. How we’re going to do that, or where we’re going to go, I have no idea. I just hope the community of Gonzales will come to our aid and lend a helping hand.”
 
For now, what will happen next remains a mystery. They are hoping there may be an affordable, mold-free historic house or downtown commercial property available which they could utilize as a home and place for the museum, and that some kind of emergency relocation grant or funding may be available to offset the costs.
 
“Perhaps there is a property owner out there reading this who would be willing to donate use of their property as a substantial tax write-off and that there are some incentives available to them from the city, county, or state for doing so” says Leigh. “Hopefully, someone would be at least willing to negotiate a rental at a substantial discount that we can afford. There are always options when people come together with a common goal and work towards a solution. I’ve seen it happen before and it’s amazing what people can do when they put their hearts and minds into something.
 
“We made a concious decision to relocate the museum to Gonzales because we love the amazing history of this town and we see the potential of what it can become in the future,” she says. “We’re willing to work very hard to help make that happen. We’ve invested in Gonzales – now we’re hoping Gonzales will invest in us.”
 
Anyone who might have a solution or who would like to volunteer with the effort can call the Douglas Fairbanks Museum at 830-444-0523 or visit them online at DouglasFairbanks.org.
 

Read Full Post »